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In the Field Snacks
MAY
8
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Guest blog: Fear and deportation

By Charlotte Steinecke

By Julie McClure, founder and program director of CalSERVES. This blog was originally published on BOOST Cafe on March 15. For more information about addressing immigration issues, check out our “How Afterschool Programs can Support their Immigrant Students, Families, and Community” webinar and fill our feedback survey to help us make sure that we are providing resources that are topical and relevant to the field. This webinar is part of an on-going series focused on ways in which afterschool can create constructive climates in out-of-school time. Check back for the next webinar in the series that will address understanding and responding to identity-based bullying.‚Äč

What can afterschool programs do to support children who are experiencing fears related to the impacts of deportation? Many of our programs work with children and families who have deep fears about the changing immigration climate and increased deportations. Knowing what to do to support students and families on these issues can be hard for staff. They want to help but do not have expertise in this area. They also want to know what is okay to say and do in their role.

Here are some actions that can be taken in partnership with our school districts to address these new immigration issues. In developing this list, I relied heavily on the resources of Teaching Tolerance.

  1. Issue a program-wide statement in multiple languages indicating that the program is a safe and welcoming environment for all students.
  2. Focus on building inclusive environments to reinforce the feeling of safety and security. This could range from establishing classroom ground rules to anti-bullying programs to creating time each day for students to express themselves in a safe environment.
  3. Support staff in how to speak to students. Staff should let students know that they have a right to a safe educational environment. Staff can also let students know that it is okay to be confused or scared and that there are resources available to support them. It is, however, also important staff not make promises that cannot be kept in this uncertain environment.
  4. Create a bilingual list of community organizations who provide resources, counseling, and support on immigration issues. This list can then serve as a referral list for when issues arise.
  5. Provide materials and community resources that support families in knowing their rights. Many communities also have organizations that are holding workshops on these issues that you can share with your families. Here are some additional sources of information on immigration rights as they pertain to schools:
  6. Identify a bilingual staff member to be a resource for families around these issues.
  7. Work with the school to provide counseling and support to students who have had a family member deported.
  8. Provide support for staff and time for them to talk about these complex issues.

For everyone working in expanded learning programs, you are providing a safe and vital environment to all children and families. You help students feel safe, supported, and heard, which is so important now.

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learn more about: Guest Blog
MAY
2
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Guest blog: Advice for advocates of afterschool

By Charlotte Steinecke

By Chris Neitzey, Policy Director for New York’s statewide afterschool network, the New York State Network for Youth Success. Chris can be reached at chris@networkforyouthsuccess.org.

As a follow up to my January 12 guest blog on New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s afterschool proposal, I’m happy to report that the New York State budget, which was passed on April 9, includes $35 million in new funding to expand afterschool programming to 22,000 students across the state beginning in September 2017.

At a time when uncertainty surrounds the future of the 21st Century Community Learning Center Program, New York has begun to see the importance of directly investing in high-quality afterschool programs. The $35 million investment represents the largest annual increase the state of New York has ever made in afterschool programs, and with the funding targeted at cities and school districts in high-need areas, it’s a welcome acknowledgement of the role afterschool programs can play in addressing the needs of low-income families.

The end result of this year’s state budget may have been an overwhelming success for afterschool, but New York’s three month “budget session” was anything but easy for advocates. This was not the first time a large proposal to fund afterschool programs was put on the table by the governor, and advocates knew there would be a long battle ahead to secure this funding in the final budget.

Below are a few ways we kept the pressure on the governor and legislature to ensure this proposal became a reality:

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learn more about: Advocacy Guest Blog State Policy
APR
27
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Keys to program success from afterschool professionals

By Charlotte Steinecke

This Afterschool Professionals Appreciation Week, we’re celebrating you: the educators who dedicate your careers to teaching and supporting youth during the out-of-school hours. To highlight the expertise of a few leading professionals in our field, and foster widespread sharing of best practices, we asked four afterschool leaders from across the country to share their keys to success and sustainability.

Have your own pro-tip to share? We want to hear it!

Find ways to serve many needs at once.

“I teach sophisticated language, because it’s a key part of the success we’re having and a reason the engagement we have is so broad-based: people want to be empowered by words. You have to pull kids up—our program is based on research that low-income children have a 30-million-word deficit in oral communication by the time they’re four years old. And when we combine that with gardening, we’re connecting to so many family histories and cultural heritages, and at the same time we’re teaching biology, botany, chemistry, vocabulary, and community service.

“By connecting our work that way, by empowering kids with this rich oral vocabulary, we’re increasing literacy significantly. For a school like mine, which is underachieving, that gets you some buy-in!

“Parents say ‘Oh, wow! They’re doing better in reading math! I’m going to encourage my kids to go to your summer program and afterschool program.’ But if we were to distance ourselves completely from the academics, they would say, ‘We need you to help meet the school needs, not just babysit the kids after school!’ So we need to give them the academic boost they need.

“Be independent of the curriculum, but honor the need for the literacy and math, and tie it into what the kids love. Give kids choice about how they use their time, in physical activity or gardening or service as teachers to younger kids.”  

– MaryAnn Bash, director of Each One Tech One: No More Gap in Colorado

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learn more about: Afterschool Voices Community Partners
APR
25
2017

IN THE FIELD
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How Maryland afterschool partnerships promote health and wellness

By Charlotte Steinecke

Written by Matt Freeman

 

At left, youth from Mars Estates PAL with the PAL center’s new cornhole boards, courtesy of Billy from Creative Touch Graphix.  At right, Albert Lewis demonstrates physical activity exercises at University of Maryland Extension 4H.

“Candy’s not a food!”

Those words from an afterschool student at a Boys & Girls Club in Glen Burnie, Maryland, and the fundamental realization about food choices they reflect, go straight to the heart of the Maryland Out of School Time (MOST) Network’s Healthy Behaviors Initiative (HBI).

Begun in 2013, this effort to promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) standards rests on a web of partnerships MOST has built with afterschool and summer-learning program providers, a statewide hunger relief organization, one of the mid-Atlantic region’s largest grocery chains and a university-based nutrition education program.

The initiative began when the MOST Network “became the first statewide healthy-out-of-school time intermediary to bring the training, resources and support of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation to out-of-school-time (OST) program providers,” according to Ellie Mitchell, MOST network director.

MOST’s first step was to identify afterschool programs to participate. For that, MOST partnered with the Maryland Food Bank, which operates a meal distribution network based in soup kitchens, food pantries and schools across the state, providing more than 41 million meals to Marylanders every year.

The need for the food bank’s services is pressing. Between 2012 and 2016, as the nation’s economy recovered from the Great Recession, participation in the National School Lunch Program, which provides meal subsidies for children of low-income families, declined nationally by more than 1.3 million children. But Maryland was one of eight states to buck that positive trend as more children from low-income families in the state became eligible. The Food Bank provided support to MOST to work with ten afterschool sites in the Food Bank’s network, with funding provided by the Giant Food Foundation, the charitable arm of a regional grocery store chain.

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learn more about: Guest Blog Health and Wellness
APR
24
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Celebrating the professionals at the heart of afterschool

By Charlotte Steinecke

From April 24 to 28, it's Afterschool Professionals Appreciation Week! Sponsored by the National Afterschool Association, the week "is a joint effort of community partners, afterschool programs, youth and child care workers, and individuals who have committed to declaring the last full week of April each year as a time to recognize and appreciate those who work with youth during out-of-school hours." It's the ideal opportunity to thank and celebrate the nation’s roughly 850,000 dedicated and passionate afterschool professionals who work with our youth during out-of-school time.

Head over to the website to learn more about the week, spread the word, and join the celebration

From the Afterschool Alliance, thank you to the afterschool professionals who enrich the lives of their students and communities every day!

APR
21
2017

IN THE FIELD
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How to plan a successful site visit for your representatives

By Charlotte Steinecke

As Congress’ Memorial Day recess approaches, your afterschool program has an excellent opportunity to organize a site visit and show your representatives the important work your program is doing. Site visits are a fantastic way for new and established programs alike to build up relationships with elected officials, and for elected officials to see firsthand that afterschool works.

To kick start your site visit planning, here are some top tools and strategies for maximizing your site visit’s impact.

Resources

  • Check out the Afterschool for All Challenge toolkit. You’ll find a general overview of how to host a successful site visit, some do’s and don’ts for a great event, and a sample invitation for you to send to your member of Congress. Our outreach strategies page also has a five-step plan to conducting a great visit.
  • Explore a toolkit from a statewide afterschool network. The Indiana Afterschool Network’s toolkit contains tips, techniques, and templates to make a site visit a success. Read through the planning guide, use the event checklist, and learn how to pitch your site visit to local media to boost your event’s profile.
  • Watch a webinar. While you’re developing your strategy, it’s helpful to hear firsthand accounts from other programs and afterschool advocates about their experiences conducting site visits.  Check out our webinar on the impact of the president’s budget proposal, with tips from a program director on the best ways to maximize your site visit’s impact.

Strategies

  • Do your research. Know who your elected officials are and what subjects are most important to them. Having insight into a policy maker’s platform makes it much easier to design a visit that will persuade them: if a policy maker has repeatedly expressed concern about childhood obesity, highlighting the work your program does to encourage healthy eating and physical activity will resonate!
  • Find your champions. Identify the students, parents, program staff, school officials, and other individuals who are best equipped to represent your program. Ask them if they’d be interested in attending the visit, give them some background on the official who will be present, show them a basic schedule, and encourage them to prepare for a conversation.
  • Showcase your best programming. Select the programming you want to highlight during the visit—STEM learning sessions and other academic enrichment are often the top picks for visits. Include the policy maker in snack time and let them interact with your student representatives before facilitating a discussion between parent representatives and the policy maker. The opportunity to let an elected official talk with their constituents about the importance of afterschool is not to be missed!
  • Follow up after the visit. The visit may be over, but the conversation has just begun! Be sure to send a thank-you message after the visit and stay in touch with your representative. Having a strong relationship with your elected officials is key to the long-term wellness of your afterschool program.

Finally, here’s some advice from Kim Templeman, a former Afterschool Ambassador and elementary school principal who hosted a successful site visit at her afterschool program:

“Be persistent. Don’t feel like you are imposing on the official’s time—they are there to represent you, and their job is to understand and get involved in what you do. … Be prepared to talk specifics. Don’t just say ‘we still need your funding.’ Explain to the official how you budget your program and show the official what funds support different activities. That way, the official can understand the reality of an afterschool program’s needs, and what your program needs most.”

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learn more about: Congress
APR
18
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Guest blog: Three ways to score #WellnessWins after school

By Charlotte Steinecke

By Sharon Dziedzic-Blanco, Education Supervisor, City of Hialeah’s Young Leaders with Character, Miami-Dade County, FL.

Sharon Dziedzic-Blanco oversees two programs with 15 out-of-school time sites that have been working with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Out-of-School Time Initiative since 2013.

While many afterschool programs already support kids in making healthy choices by serving nutritious snacks or offering physically active games, we can have a bigger impact by adopting a comprehensive wellness policy that ensures these practices are uniform and long-lasting.

We’re using the Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Out-of-School Time model wellness policy to develop a strategy that meets our wellness goals and aligns with national standards. We’re learning a lot along the way – and already seeing great progress!

That’s why we’re thrilled that the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, in partnership with the American Heart Association’s Voices for Healthy Kids initiative, launched a campaign called #WellnessWins about the benefits of wellness policies.

I’m excited to share three of the top-performing strategies we use to adopt wellness policies in our afterschool sites.

Reinforce healthy messages kids learn in school

When schools and afterschool programs coordinate wellness policy priorities, students receive a consistent message that their health is a priority, no matter the setting. Like Miami-Dade County Public Schools, we provide USDA-compliant snacks and encourage students to participate in at least 30-45 minutes of physical activity five days a week.

Elevate staff members as role model

Afterschool staff can set a healthy example by consuming nutritious foods and beverages and staying active. A wellness policy can provide staff with guidelines on how to maintain a healthy lifestyle and become a positive role model for kids.

Encourage students to engage in wellness

We incorporate nutrition lessons into our afterschool program and summer camp to encourage kids to try new foods and learn new recipes. When kids have a hands-on experience, they’re more likely to be excited about practicing healthy habits for years to come.

Ready to follow our lead and achieve wellness wins in your afterschool program? Visit WellnessWins.org to get started today!

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learn more about: Guest Blog Health and Wellness
APR
17
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Afterschool Spotlight: Denise Sellers, Director of Haddonfield Child Care

By Charlotte Steinecke

This post is presented as part of the Afterschool Spotlight blog series, which tells the stories of the parents, participants and providers of afterschool programs. The most recent Afterschool Spotlight illustrated how an Iowa afterschool program built a valuable partnership with local law enforcement.

Photo courtesy of the Haddonfield Sun

After three decades of serving as the director of Haddonfield Child Care, Denise Sellers finds herself thinking about one crucial concept: perspective.  

“As I start to make the transition out of this role,” Denise says, “I find myself thinking more and more about new viewpoints. In 1986 I was the right person to hire because I understood the plight of the parents, but there might be something I’m missing as I become part of another generation. Fresher perspective is something that will help the program remain responsive and relevant in the future.”

But that’s not to say that the program isn’t responsive and relevant now. The community of Haddonfield, N.J. has benefited from the exemplary childcare provided by Denise and her team for more than 30 years. This year marks two celebratory occasions for the program: first, an alumnus has enrolled his own child in Haddonfield Child Care, giving the program its first second-generation student.

Second, Denise has been honored as a recipient of a New Jersey Women of Achievement Award. The Haddonfield Sun's recent profile on Denise describes the award as celebrating women who take leadership roles in improving their communities and dedicate their personal and professional lives to creating a positive and lasting impact on others. It’s a description that fits Denise to a T.

Denise describes Haddonfield as small and close-knit, with a vibrant spirit of volunteerism and plenty of overlapping attendance across community groups. It’s a recipe for high buy-in; when members of the Garden Club are also members of the Women’s Club, there’s an opportunity to make connections across the community and encourage reciprocity.

“Because they know me from other community groups, I was able to go to the Women’s Club as an afterschool professional and ask them to support funding for 21st Century Community Learning Centers,” Denise says. “Haddonfield Child Care isn’t eligible for it, but we know how important it is for other communities in New Jersey. I was able to advocate on the part of other afterschool programs because my connections to other community groups were already there.”