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Afterschool Policy Snacks
JAN
12
2018

POLICY
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New Year, new budget, same federal spending quagmire

By Erik Peterson

In less than ten days, Congress will again face a deadline to address FY 2018 federal funding. The third continuing resolution (CR) passed by Congress in late December is scheduled to expire at midnight on January 19, 2018, and a way forward through the impasse has not yet emerged. While Congressional leadership from both parties and both chambers continue to meet with the administration to craft a new budget deal, the likelihood of a government shutdown later this month increases as every day goes by, and federal spending levels for a wide array of functions, including afterschool program support to local communities, remain uncertain. Additionally, the kick-off to the FY 2019 spending process is quickly approaching with the Trump administration expected to present their new budget proposal on or around February 5, 2018.

Several scenarios remain possible later this month:

  • A deal could be reached (see the main barriers to reaching a deal discussed below), securing topline funding levels and a final omnibus spending bill. A fourth CT would be needed, however, going into mid-to-late February to give appropriators enough time to write the omnibus bill.
  • No deal is reached, but enough agreement is found to pass another short-term CR to allow negotiations to continue.
  • No deal is reached and a government shutdown takes place until agreement can be found.
DEC
22
2017

POLICY
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The year in federal afterschool policy

By Erik Peterson

Federal afterschool policy in 2017 had ups and downs, and plenty ‘firsts.’ It was the first time a president proposed complete elimination of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers initiative – the primary source of federal funding support for local school and community based afterschool and summer learning programs. However, 2017 also saw the largest advocacy push on record by afterschool advocates – with tens of thousands of Americans making the case for continued federal afterschool support. And the year saw a record level of funding for Community Learning Centers, providing access to programs for almost 2 million young people. 

21st Century Community Learning Centers

Early in the year both the president’s “skinny budget” and final FY2018 budget proposed the elimination of all funding for Community Learning Centers. The afterschool field’s response was rapid and powerful. Afterschool allies reached out to Congress with more than 79,400 calls and emails, energized supporters to turn out at town halls in their communities, and prompted more than 1,400 local, state, and national organizations to sign a letter in support of Community Learning Centers. Champions of the program on Capitol Hill showed strong support for Community Learning Centers as well, with 81 members of the House coming together across party lines and signing a letter spear headed by Reps. David Cicilline and Lou Barletta. In addition, a perfectly-timed National Afterschool Summit at University of Southern California put afterschool all over the news and social media including coverage on CNN and Extra with Mario Lopez. 

In a huge win for afterschool, the final appropriations bill for FY2017, passed in early May 2017, increased Community Learning Centers funding to $1.192 billion, a $25 million increase over the FY2016 level, and a record amount of funding for the program. The funds mean almost 2 million children in all 50 states will have access to quality, locally-run afterschool and summer learning programs. While funding for FY2018 is still uncertain as the country is operating under a continuing resolution that expires on December 22, 2017, support for Community Learning Centers in Congress remains strong.

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learn more about: 21st CCLC Congress Federal Policy
DEC
20
2017

POLICY
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Wrapping up 2017: A review of state policy highlights

By Jillian Luchner

It’s almost January. As many state legislatures prepare to begin new legislative sessions, it’s a good time to look at the 2017 state policy year in review. 

In afterschool policy, some states saw major developments in state funding. Illinois received appropriations for afterschool Teen REACH programs for the first time in many years, New York's Governor dedicated $35 million in new funding for afterschool across the state, and California received an increase in per-pupil funding for its state funded ASES programs. Texas instituted legislation to require school districts to report on the percentage of students in schools involved in afterschool and summer learning activities.  

Other funding efforts across states, with bills introduced but which did not make it into law before the end of session, included Minnesota ($5 million for competitive grants for positive youth development); Vermont (matching grants for out of school time programs); Maine (a summer success program) and Hawaii (for middle-school afterschool program funding). And in a tough year for state budgets, many states fought back against what would have been large cuts in state funding streams for programs.

 

NOV
27
2017

POLICY
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Continuing resolution or spending omnibus?: Afterschool federal funding update

By Erik Peterson

Dec. 22, 2017 Update: Congress passed a third continuing resolution prior to the Dec. 22nd deadline extending govt funding at current year levels (including 21st CCLC) until January 19th. 

Dec. 8, 2017 Update: The House and Senate both passed a stop gap spending measure last night that keeps the federal government open and funded until December 22. Congress plans to use the additional weeks to strike a spending deal that will pave the way for a third temporary continuing resolution that will last into 2018. A final omnibus spending bill is expected in early 2018 that will fund the government through September 30, 2018.

While the process continues, more than 500 local, state, and national organizations came together last month to send a letter to Appropriators calling for full funding for 21st CCLC that supports local afterschool programs.  

As November ends, Congress has just 12 days before the expiration of the continuing resolution that is currently funding the government on December 8. While there is little time left before this deadline, negotiations continue between House and Senate leadership from both parties with the goal of striking a deal that will raise defense and non-defense spending caps paving the way for a FY 2018 omnibus spending bill.    

Earlier this month Senate Appropriations Committee chair Thad Cochran (R-Miss.) issued an official statement regarding the committee’s responsibility to fund the government, urging leadership and the White House to make a spending deal as soon as possible. However there are a number of barriers preventing a deal, including final agreement on top level defense and non-defense spending levels, whether to include a bipartisan healthcare subsidy package, funding for the border wall, an agreement on DACA, and other issues.

If Congress does not reach a spending deal this week, they are likely to pass a short-term continuing resolution (CR), which would temporarily allow the government to remain open and operating at last year’s funding levels. Many members of Congress want to complete the FY 2018 spending package before the end of the calendar year, while other members – particularly members of the House Republican Study Committee – do not want to be pushed to vote on a final bill while also trying to pass a tax cut bill and another supplemental disaster relief bill by December 31, preferring that the next CR reach into the new year. Even without an extension, the present short-term CR could extend into late December or possibly into January or February, providing additional time to reach a deal. If Congress does not pass a temporary continuing resolution, the government will shut down.

If leadership can broker a spending deal, appropriators will then negotiate individual funding levels for each government program. 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) funding was set at $1.192 billion by the Senate earlier this fall; however the House has proposed $1.1 billion for Community Learning Centers. While final spending levels will most likely fall within that range, the lower level of $1.1 billion would mean almost 100,000 youth could lose access to programming.

Friends of afterschool can weigh in with Congress here about the importance of federal afterschool funding that provides support for local school and community based organizations that serve almost 1.8 million children.  

NOV
7
2017

POLICY
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What could the Tax Cut Bill mean for afterschool programs?

By Erik Peterson

On November 2 House Republicans released their proposed tax cut/tax reform package, called the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This bill is on an aggressive timeline and could pass the House as soon as the week of November 13. The House Ways and Means Committee will mark up the bill beginning at noon on Monday, November 6. It is expected to take several days to complete the mark up.

The tax cut bill released by the Chair of the House Ways and Means Committee Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas) is based largely on the Trump Administration’s tax cut outline released earlier this fall. According to the Ways and Means Committee, “The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will deliver real tax relief to Americans across the country – especially low- and middle-income Americans who have been struggling for far too long to earn a raise and get ahead.” Under the legislation, the authors state that a typical middle-income family of four, earning $59,000 (the median household income), will receive a $1,182 tax cut, which is about $22.73 a week or $3.24 a day.

There are several possible impacts of the tax cut bill on the afterschool field:

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learn more about: Congress Federal Funding Federal Policy
SEP
25
2017

POLICY
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New state progress reports for Child Care and Development Block Grant

By Tiereny Lloyd

Recently, the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) released The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014: Uneven State Implementation of Key Policies report. The report tracks and analyzes the extent to which states made policy changes based on four key areas addressed by the CCDBG reauthorization law. Those four key indicators of a state’s progress are:

  1. Additional staff hired to implement the law’s new licensing and monitoring requirements
  2. Length of the eligibility period during which families can continue to receive child care assistance without having to recertify
  3. Payment to child care providers for days when children receiving child care assistance are absent
  4. Differential (higher) payments rates for special needs care, care during nontraditional hours and other specialized care

Those four indicators were selected because they reflected the range of objectives in the law related to improving the health and safety of child care, the supply and quality of child care, and families’ access to child care assistance. Let’s take a closer look at the number of states that made policy changes between the time the law was enacted and the middle of 2017 under each indicator.

 

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learn more about: Federal Policy State Policy Child Care
SEP
14
2017

POLICY
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$100 million win for afterschool as amendment passes House of Representatives

By Erik Peterson

Last night the House of Representatives voted 228 to 188 in support of the DeLauro/Lowey amendment (#161) to restore $100 million of the 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) afterschool and summer learning funding that had been cut in the Make America Secure and Prosperous Appropriations Act (H.R. 3354). The vote sends a strong signal of bipartisan support for afterschool and summer learning programs as the appropriations process continues into the fall.

The amendment vote was the latest step in the long appropriations and spending process that began last spring when the president’s budget proposed elimination of Community Learning Centers afterschool funding. The inclusion of the amendment stands as a testament to the hard work of our field — advocates and allied organizations have delivered more than 78,600 calls and emails to Congress in support of federal funding for local afterschool and summer learning programs since March. Read Afterschool Alliance Executive Director Jodi Grant’s statement here.

SEP
13
2017

POLICY
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Diverse voices gather on Capitol Hill to testify for afterschool

By Jillian Luchner

On September 12, 2017 the Senate Afterschool Caucus led by Senators Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Franken (D-Minn.) hosted a “Back to Afterschool” briefing highlighting a diverse panel of experts from the military, health, education, government, and philanthropic sectors. Each speaker attested to the value of afterschool and summer programs from their unique vantage point and the need for a combination of federal, state, and local support.

Afterschool Alliance Executive Director Jodi Grant opened the panel by noting that the research on the positive impacts of afterschool programs is clear, and programs across the country are making a huge difference for students and families.

“The effectiveness of high quality afterschool and summer programs,” Grant stated, “should not be in question. Support for these programs runs wide and deep.”