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Afterschool Snack, the afterschool blog. The latest research, resources, funding and policy on expanding quality afterschool and summer learning programs for children and youth. An Afterschool Alliance resource.
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Recent Afterschool Snacks
OCT
23

RESEARCH
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Two new reports add to the case for investing in youth programs

By Erik Peterson

With Lights On Afterschool upon us and fresh on the heels of the new America After 3PM (AA3) data, two additional reports further make the case for supporting afterschool and summer learning programs. This week, Opportunity Nation released the 2014 Opportunity Index and the Children’s Leadership Council announced a new public opinion poll showing strong support for investing in effective programs that improve the lives of children and youth.

The Opportunity Index is an annual composite measure at the state and county levels of 16 economic, educational and civic factors that expand or restrict upward mobility. The Opportunity Index ranks all 50 states plus Washington, D.C., and found that access to opportunity has increased by more than 6 percent nationwide since the first iteration of the Index in 2011. Much of this growth is due to large improvements on specific economic and educational indicators (such as the unemployment rate, Internet access and on-time high school graduation rate). There was less robust improvement on civic indicators such as access to healthful food, volunteerism and access to health care. In spite of gains in opportunity overall, the Index also shows that this progress is not enough to ensure that all Americans, particularly teens and young adults, get their fair shot at the American Dream. In particular, while the number of young Americans ages 16-24 who are neither in school nor working dropped significantly since 2013—from 5.8 million to 5.6 million in 2014—the four-year trend is more modest: there were 5.66 million disconnected youth in 2011. Afterschool and summer learning programs, particularly for older youth, can help close the opportunity gap by engaging young people through quality college and career readiness programs.

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learn more about: America After 3PM Equity Evaluations Youth Development
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SEP
24

POLICY
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House, Senate approve FY15 continuing resolution

By Erik Peterson

With 12 days remaining in the current federal fiscal year, both chambers approved a continuing resolution (CR) late last week ensuring that the federal government will be funded and operational through Dec. 11. The stopgap measure is funded at $1 trillion, which is less than the Senate would like but more than the Budget Control Act actually allows.  Once the bill expires in mid-December, Congress will have to decide whether to extend the CR a few more months until the next Congress gets organized, or to go ahead and fund federal operations for the remainder of the fiscal year. It's not too late to reach out to your representative and senators to encourage their support of afterschool programs.

Congress is now in recess until after the Nov. 4 election. The Senate has already announced its Nov. 12 return. When Congress returns it will resume as a lame duck session that could address a number of issues in addition to the CR. Many Members of Congress will be in their districts campaigning next month, which presents an excellent opportunity to invite incumbents and candidates to Lights On Afterschool celebrations as a way to raise awareness of  the impact that afterschool and summer learning programs have on children, youth, their families and communities.

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learn more about: Budget Congress Election Legislation
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AUG
4

IN THE FIELD
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Guest Blog: Taking action to provide physical activity afterschool

By Erik Peterson

Wendy Broderick is Chief Development Office of the YMCA of Columbia, SC, and a 2013-2014 Afterschool Ambassador

 

In August 2011, the YMCA of the USA adopted the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Standards (HEPA Standards) for their afterschool and summer day camp programs. The HEPA Standards outline goals for 1) the nutritional quality of the foods and beverages provided in afterschool programs and those foods and beverages consumed in summer day camps and 2) the amount of physical activity children accumulate while attending these programs.

The YMCA of Columbia and personnel from University of South Carolina partnered together to create strategies to meet the HEPA Standards.  A collaborative workgroup met monthly from September 2011 to May 2012 to identify areas where the programs could be modified, without substantial monetary investment, to achieve the HEPA Standards. The result of these meetings was the development of a comprehensive and coordinated set of strategies called STEPs to HEPA (Strategies To Enhance Practice). STEPs to HEPA were adopted January 2012. Evaluation before the strategies were implemented took place during July, September, and October 2011. Evaluation of the impact of the strategies took place April 2012 through August 2013. 

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learn more about: Afterschool Ambassadors Guest Blog Health and Wellness Nutrition State Policy Sustainability
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JUL
2

POLICY
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State afterschool policy update

By Erik Peterson

While Congress remains stalled with the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the 2015 budget appropriations process; states and localities are experiencing considerable momentum. Among the jurisdictions making progress in advancing funding and policy for afterschool programs are Washington, D.C., New York state and California:

  • In Washington, D.C., the city council recently passed their FY2015 budget, including a modest increase in the D.C. Public Schools Out-of-School Time Program to support afterschool and summer learning programs, resulting in a total funding level of $8.4 million. Funding to support community-based organizations providing expanded learning programming was held stable and includes $10 million for 21st Century Community Learning Center grants and $3 million for the D.C. Children & Youth Investment Trust Corporation. The D.C. community schools initiative was funded at $500,000. 
  • In New York state last week the governor announced awardees for the first round of Extended Learning Time grants, while in New York City the mayor recently released details of a $145 million expansion of middle school afterschool programs as well as $52 million for the development of 40 community schools. The $24 million Extended Learning Time grants were awarded to nine school districts statewide, including NYC. The state Department of Education has posted a list of the winners on its website. The $52 million grant to launch the development of 40 innovative community schools will match comprehensive social services and learning programs with 40 high-need public schools across NYC. Coupled with pre-K for every child and expanded afterschool programs for middle school students, the mayor pledged to make community schools a key component of transforming the education system and lifting up every child.
  • In California last week, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson announced 333 programs will receive a combined $51 million in state and federal grants to provide expanded learning opportunities for students to bolster student learning outside of the regular school hours. In the latest round of funding, $51 million was distributed through three grants: the After School Education and Safety program, the federal 21st Century Community Learning Centers—Elementary & Middle Schools program, and the state 21st Century High School After School Safety and Enrichment for Teens program. More information on the awarded grants can be accessed through the California Department of Education’s Before & After School webpage. 
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learn more about: 21st CCLC Budget ESEA Legislation State Policy Sustainability
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APR
30

NEWS ROUNDUP
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Weekly Media Roundup - April 30, 2014

By Luci Manning

Learning From the Habitat Outside Your Door (Herald and News, Oregon)

Pelican Elementary School will soon be home to a wildlife habitat, and even though it is not entirely complete, second graders in the 21st Century Community Learning Centers afterschool program are already enjoying it.  With guidance from local Klamath Watershed Partnership and Great Outdoors Alliance educators, students are getting hands-on learning experiences right outside their classrooms.  Maureen Lundy, a teacher who has been heavily involved in planning the schoolyard habitat, told the Herald and News that “the idea is to have this cool habitat right outside Pelican’s door” where students can collect samples and engage in engineering design in a different learning environment.

Los Lobos Recruit White Elementary Mariachi Program Members to Open Tucson Show (Arizona Daily Star, Arizona)

Much to the delight of parents and students alike, the afterschool mariachi program at John E. White Elementary School opened for rock band Los Lobos at the Rialto Theatre last Friday.  Hearing the band was coming to town, Bill Mark, the program’s advisor, told the Arizona Daily Star that he emailed Los Lobos to see if they could speak to the kids, but Los Lobos took his request one step further and asked if some of the afterschool students could open for the band.  Mark told the Arizona Daily Star that he “Wasn’t really expecting a response, so this was a huge surprise.” 

YMCA Teaches Empathy through Animals (Daily Independent, Kentucky)

An afterschool program featuring some furry friends is helping students translate their compassion for animals onto their fellow students.  The program teaches young people to be calm, confident and caring through dog-related activities that help develop inter-personal skills that can later be used in the classroom, at home and even in the workplace.  Norma Meek, YMCA board member who prompted the introduction of the Mutt-i-gree curriculum, told the Daily Independent that “Children realize that all pets come in different shapes, sizes and colors.  All pets have strengths and feelings…There are Pedigrees and Muttigrees, some are mixed breeds, but they’re all wonderful – just like people.”

High School Students to Rock Homegrown (Duluth Budgeteer News, Minnesota)

The Duluth Homegrown Music Festival welcomed performances by local middle and high school students earlier this week.  The students, some in bands and others performing solo, were well prepared to showcase their talents thanks to the many hours spent practicing after school at the Music Resource Center (MRC).  Students were given their own hour-long time slot during the eight-day festival.  Emily Haavik, program manager of the MRC, told the Duluth Budgeteer News that “we want to give kids with a passion for music an avenue to advance their skills, compose, practice, record, learn.  It’s also a place to go after school where they can hang out while developing their skills.”

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learn more about: Arts Youth Development
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APR
4

POLICY
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It's appropriations season: 2015 appropriations process continues in House and Senate

By Erik Peterson

With the House and Senate each passing their own budget resolutions last month, and the president’s budget request submitted to Congress earlier this month, the FY2014 appropriations process can now move forward.  A challenge for Congress early in the process is trying to reconcile the House and Senate FY2014 budget bills.  Reconciling the two is a difficult prospect as the Senate resolution has $92 billion more than the House does to fund programs.
 
Despite the differences, House and Senate appropriations committees have begun holding hearings on the FY2014 spending bills, including Labor, HHS, Education (LHHS) Appropriations Subcommittee hearings featuring testimony by Education Secretary Arne Duncan.  At the House subcommittee hearing in early April, Reps. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) and Nita Lowey (D-NY) emphasized the importance of  maintaining strong investments in afterschool programs through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC)  initiative and cautioned against diverting federal afterschool funding.  As part of her formal statement, LHHS Subcommittee Ranking Member DeLauro addressed the need for an increase in funding while also noting her concerns with the Administration’s proposed changes to the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) initiative:
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learn more about: 21st CCLC Budget Congress ESEA Federal Funding
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MAR
21

IN THE FIELD
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The driving force behind our work

By Jodi Grant

On Monday, the National AfterSchool Association released their list of the top 25 most influential people in afterschool.  I was honored to be included on that list, along with our wonderful board members Terry Peterson and Lucy Friedman. The recognition provided a nice moment to step back and celebrate the hard work of our team, and to reflect on why this work is so important, and why we are so determined to expand afterschool resources nationwide.

We are dogged in our work because the people and programs in the afterschool field are nothing short of amazing.  Afterschool programs are changing lives; saving a child from hunger; creating innovative approaches to learning; and developing our next generation of leaders, citizens and scientists. And they are doing it on a shoestring budget with a will that won’t quit and a mind for innovation. 

There are hundreds of stories and people that come to mind, but I thought I’d share just a few examples of what drives us to get up and work as hard as we possibly can to give voice to the afterschool field.  I’d love to hear your afterschool inspirations, too, so please take a moment and send in your thoughts in the comment field below.

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learn more about: Advocacy Afterschool Voices Inside the Afterschool Alliance
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MAR
13

STEM
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The FY2015 budget request and how it might impact afterschool STEM programs

By Anita Krishnamurthi

The Administration released its budget request for FY2015 last week and STEM education has fared quite well overall.  Although the reorganization of STEM education programs across various federal agencies has been proposed again, this year’s version is less drastic and doesn't suggest transferring funds between agencies.  Thirty-one programs across nine agencies, totaling $145 million, would be consolidated or eliminated under the plan, which is a much smaller number than the 78 programs proposed in last year's budget request.  See the high-level list and explanation here (pgs. 153 and 157). 

The overall federal STEM funding level would be $2.9 billion under the request, an increase of 3.7 percent over the FY2014 enacted level.  Some of the funding for STEM education at agencies such as NASA, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) would be restored, which is very good news for informal science education programs and providers.  

At the Department of Education, $110 million is requested for STEM Innovation Networks; the funds would be used to “award grants to school districts in partnership with colleges and other regional partners to transform STEM teaching and learning by accelerating the adoption of practices in P-12 education that help to increase the number students who seek out and are well-prepared for postsecondary education and careers in STEM fields.”  If the program and funds materialize, there may be opportunities here for afterschool networks and providers to collaborate with school districts.

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learn more about: Budget Department of Education NASA Obama Science
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