Overview of local funding sources

A variety of options to tap

On the local level, there are a variety of common sources of public funding for afterschool. A county or city governing body may allocate general funds toward afterschool or may add afterschool programs into the budgets of local agencies, such as a parks and recreation department.

A local funding source can also be created by establishing a special dedicated revenue source generated from narrowly based taxes, licensing fees, user fees or other special fees. For example, Washington state uses the revenues from a special tax on alcohol, tobacco and soda pop syrup to fund family support and other violence-prevention activities.

Below are some of the local sources and people in your community that you should contact to pursue funding:
 

School district or county office of education

School Principal, Superintendent, School Board Members

County or city general funds

Mayor, City Council, County Board of Supervisors, City Manager

County or city parks and recreation departments

Head of the Parks and Recreation Department, Mayor, City Council, County Board of Supervisors

County or city youth service bureaus

Head of the Youth Service Bureau, Mayor, City Council, County Board of Supervisors

County or city social services departments

Head of the Human Services Department, Mayor, City Council, County Board of Supervisors

Dedicated revenue sources (such as a garbage collection tax)

Mayor, City Council, County Board of Supervisors, City Manager

 

To see successful examples of afterschool programs that have pieced together funding from local as well as other sources, check out the profiles on the Finance Project's website: www.financeproject.org.