nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

nike air max

Afterschool in New Hampshire

Facts & Research

  • In New Hampshire, 6% of Elementary School children, 35% of Middle School children and 63% of High School children are responsible for taking care of themselves after school.
  • Of all New Hampshire children not currently enrolled in afterschool, 32% (60,735) would be likely to participate IF an afterschool program were available in their community.
  • 87% of parents in New Hampshire are satisfied with the afterschool program their child attends.
  • 16% (35,081) of New Hampshire's K-12 children participate in afterschool programs, including 5,632 kids in programs supported by the U.S. Department of Education's 21st Century Community Learning Centers initiative, the only federal program dedicated to afterschool.

For afterschool participation and funding levels in New Hampshire, refer to the Afterschool in New Hampshire Fact Sheet.

Explore America After 3PM for even more research on afterschool programs in New Hampshire.

State Policy and Funding

In 2008, New Hampshire enacted state policy to support an extended learning opportunties (ELO) iniative. The ELO initiative expands traditional high school classroom options beyond the regular school day; creates rigorous, relevant and personalized learning experiences for all students; and grants academic credit based on demonstration of mastery of course competencies. Funding currently comes from private sources. Credentials and an accompanying training, a professional development handbook, and a continuous improvement process for afterschool programs are all currently in place as efforts to improve quality. In addition, the state has established a partnership with the higher education community to develop degree and/or certificate programs; a Quality Rating and Information System (QRIS) is upcoming.

Check out the State Policy section of our website for state-specific data and ideas for developing and advancing afterschool policy at the state level.

See Policy News for the latest on afterschool legislation from Washington, D.C.

Interested in running an afterschool tutoring program?

Find information on the application process and selection criteria for Supplemental Educational Services (SES) providers in your state here.

New Hampshire received $10 million to turn around its persistently lowest achieving schools through the ARRA-School Improvement Grants (SIG) program. ARRA-SIG grants are part of the $3.5 billion that were made available to states from money set aside in the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the FY 2010 federal budget. Eligible schools may use ARRA-SIG funding to support extended learning-time opportunities.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 offers numerous opportunities to support extended learning-time including afterschool, before school and summer programs. See more on afterschool and the Recovery here.

Your statewide afterschool network has a webpage with useful resources and policy updates: http://nhafterschool.org/

News & Voices

What's the word on afterschool in your state? News clippings, noteworthy quotes and feel good stories highlight New Hampshire's afterschool cause.

What leaders are saying in New Hampshire:

In NH, the 21st CCLC program and ELOs are leading the way, offering students new, engaging ways to acquire the skills, knowledge they need to succeed, both in school and in life.

Paul Leather
Deputy Commissioner, NH Department of Education

There are no recent afterschool news stories for New Hampshire.

Want more news on afterschool? Check out this month's Afterschool Advocate and our blog Afterschool Snack.

America's Afterschool Storybook tells the stories of people and communities transformed by afterschool programs. Read more inspiring stories from America's Afterschool Storybook from people across the country.

From Mia Clough's Afterschool Story:

This youth advocate created this pamphlet at the Afterschool for All Challenge to communicate a personal advocacy message across platforms. It was originally designed to be used as a leave-behind during meetings with Members of Congress and their staff on Capitol Hill.

Read more from Mia Clough's Afterschool Story

From Natasha Tarrien's Afterschool Story:

This youth advocate created this pamphlet at the Afterschool for All Challenge to communicate a personal advocacy message across platforms. It was originally designed to be used as a leave-behind during meetings with Members of Congress and their staff on Capitol Hill.

Read more from Natasha Tarrien's Afterschool Story

From Patricia Rogers's Afterschool Story:

This youth advocate created this pamphlet at the Afterschool for All Challenge to communicate a personal advocacy message across platforms. It was originally designed to be used as a leave-behind during meetings with Members of Congress and their staff on Capitol Hill.

Read more from Patricia Rogers's Afterschool Story

Afterschool Champions

New Hampshire has champions across the state leading the fight to ensure that all children have access to safe and enriching afterschool programs.

On March 3, 2005, members of Congress established the first-ever Afterschool Caucus in both the Senate and the House of Representatives in order to build support for afterschool programs and increase resources for quality afterschool care. The following elected officials from New Hampshire participate in their chamber's Afterschool Caucus:

House Rep. Carol Shea-Porter (D-NH)

Senate Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH)

Afterschool for All brings together individuals and organizations from across the nation who support the vision that all children and youth deserve access to quality, affordable afterschool programs. Here's a list of some prominent Afterschool for All participants in New Hampshire:

Child and Family Services, Manchester, NH

Governor John Lynch, New Hampshire

Seacoast Science Center, Rye, NH

Selected from some of the most effective afterschool programs and advocacy organizations in the nation, the Afterschool Ambassadors work every day to help keep kids safe, inspire children to learn and help working families. They know firsthand the barriers and benefits that communities face in making afterschool available to all children and are a great resource for programs throughout New Hampshire. Here is a list of past and present ambassadors in your state:

Ambassador Emeritus:
MARTINA GREEN
Laconia School District, Project EXTRA!
39 Harvard Street
Laconia, NH 3246
603-524-5710x314
mgreen@laconia.k12.nh.us

Ambassador Emeritus:
ELIZABETH COLBY
Project Promise
Newfound Regional High School
150 Newfound Road
Bristol, NH 3222
603-744-6006 ext. 129
bcolby@sau4.org

State Contact

Lynn Stanley
Network Lead
New Hampshire Afterschool Network
29 Commerce Drive
Bedford, NH 03110
603-206-6804
lstanley@seresc.net
http://nhafterschool.org/