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Snacks by Tiereny Lloyd
NOV
16
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Support healthy OST programs with this action center's state policy toolkits & funding

By Tiereny Lloyd

Voices for Healthy Kids®, an initiative of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and American Heart Association, recently released an Out of School Time (OST) Campaign Toolkit. The toolkit is designed to empower OST advocates to take action in their communities and improve health of children in OST programs. Some features of the toolkit are new graphics, social media samples, fact sheets, messaging guides, and other resources. The toolkit can be downloaded here at no cost!

While you are downloading all the wonderful resources from the new toolkit, be sure to check out the open call for proposals to advance healthy eating and physical activity in your state.  This round of funding is specifically limited to proposals in the areas of the school health (physical activity/physical education, junk food marketing, wellness, ESSA, school food, and water), early care and education, and out-of-school-time policy levers. Applications must support the Voices for Healthy Kids OST Policy Lever: Pursue policy changes that require out-of-school time programs to integrate national healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) standards into recognition programs, accreditation programs, certifications, and rating systems.

The deadline for submission is fast approaching; all applications must be submitted by December 8, 2017 at 5 p.m. PST. Visit the grant portal to learn more!

Last but not least, be sure to join the movement! As the only online national network of people focusing on helping kids grow up at a healthy weight, the Voices for Healthy Kids Action Center (formerly PreventObesity.com) is the place where leaders and organizations connect with hundreds of thousands of health and wellness supporters in advocacy efforts and policy implementation. The action center offers two pathways to membership; you can sign up as an individual leader or you can create an organization profile

If you have questions about any of the above resources, please be sure to give me a ping at tlloyd@afterschoolalliance.org, I look forward to hearing from you!

OCT
9
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Students harness healthy habits at Camp Fire Wise KidsĀ®

By Tiereny Lloyd

For the students and staff of Camp Fire Wise Kids® afterschool programs in and around Dallas, Texas, health is all about balance. By emphasizing the importance of a balanced diet and of balancing “energy in” and “energy out,” staff hope to empower children to make a lifetime’s worth of healthy and wise choices.

Like other Camp Fire programs across the nation, the Wise Kids program relies on the “Thrive{ology}” framework. Described as a “research-based, measurable approach to youth development,” Camp Fire developed the approach in partnership with the California-based Thrive Foundation for Youth. It comprises four components:

  1. Helping children identify their “sparks” – that is, their interests and passions
  2. Guiding them to adopt a “growth” mindset – the belief that they can learn new skills all the time
  3. Urging them to set and manage goals for themselves
  4. Encouraging them to reflect on what they’ve done and accomplished

Camp Fire Lone Star layers its Wise Kids framework over the health and physical education standards written into the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) standards issued by the state’s department of education. The health and physical education standards are generally in line with the Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) standards developed by the National AfterSchool Association.

SEP
25
2017

POLICY
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New state progress reports for Child Care and Development Block Grant

By Tiereny Lloyd

Recently, the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC) released The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014: Uneven State Implementation of Key Policies report. The report tracks and analyzes the extent to which states made policy changes based on four key areas addressed by the CCDBG reauthorization law. Those four key indicators of a state’s progress are:

  1. Additional staff hired to implement the law’s new licensing and monitoring requirements
  2. Length of the eligibility period during which families can continue to receive child care assistance without having to recertify
  3. Payment to child care providers for days when children receiving child care assistance are absent
  4. Differential (higher) payments rates for special needs care, care during nontraditional hours and other specialized care

Those four indicators were selected because they reflected the range of objectives in the law related to improving the health and safety of child care, the supply and quality of child care, and families’ access to child care assistance. Let’s take a closer look at the number of states that made policy changes between the time the law was enacted and the middle of 2017 under each indicator.

 

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learn more about: Federal Policy State Policy Child Care
JAN
30
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Healthy eating and physical activity highlighted during MOST Conference

By Tiereny Lloyd

The Maryland Out of School Time Network held their seventh annual statewide conference on January 5 & 6 in Ellicott City, Md., celebrating the community of out-of-school time practitioners that MOST affectionately calls “OST Heroes.”

The two-day conference was jam-packed with informative workshops, resources from various exhibitors and the first annual MOST awards ceremony. I had the distinct pleasure of moderating a healthy behaviors panel, “Healthy Behaviors: Connecting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Partnerships for OST,” with experts from the Alliance for Healthier Generation, Giant Food, John Hopkins Urban Health Institute, Leveling the Playing Field, and Maryland Extension Food Supplement Nutrition Education.

The panel had three objectives:

  • Build awareness. The prevalence of childhood in Maryland reflects the national average, where approximately one in three children ages two to 19 is overweight or obese. Since the rate of childhood obesity has tripled over the past three decades and children are now more likely to acquire risk factors for cardiovascular disease, building awareness of the issue is imperative. The panel also highlighted the sometimes overlooked relationship between food insecurity and obesity.
  • Celebrate the network’s healthy eating and physical activity successes. In 2013, through a grant from the Maryland Food Bank provided by the Giant Food Foundation, MOST became the first statewide healthy out-of-school time intermediary to bring healthy eating and physical activity resources, training, and technical assistance to Maryland out-of-school time programs. As a result of the work of three Healthy Behaviors VISTAs and several partnerships that have developed over time, MOST was able to introduce the Healthy Out-of-School Time (HOST) Framework, based on the National Afterschool Association’s Healthy Eating and Physical Activity standards, to 30 afterschool sites.
  • Take action. Since childhood obesity has become a national epidemic, we can no longer limit our prevention efforts to traditional school hours but must extend our efforts to before and after the school bell rings. To facilitate these efforts, MOST used this panel to inspire OST providers throughout Maryland to adopt the HOST Framework, become a healthy out-of-school time site and engage in the MOST Network’s Healthy Behaviors Learning Community.

The Maryland Out of School Time Network has done impactful work around Healthy Eating and Physical Activity and can be a valuable resource to other networks (and afterschool programs) looking to create and support heathier out-of-school time environments. Way to go, MOST!

SEP
19
2016

FUNDING
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Funding opportunity: Bring Soccer for Success to your afterschool program

By Tiereny Lloyd

photo courtesy of the U.S. Soccer Foundation

In partnership with Trinity Health, the U.S. Soccer Foundation recently announced a funding opportunity to expand their free out of school program, Soccer for Success. The Foundation seeks community partners to implement this program for 12 weeks during the spring of 2017, and who will return to operate the program for 24 weeks during the 2017-2018 academic year (fall 2017 through spring 2018).

What is Soccer for Success?

Soccer for Success is an evidence-based program created by the U.S. Soccer Foundation that uses soccer as a tool to address children’s health issues and juvenile delinquency, while promoting healthy lifestyles in urban and underserved communities. The program’s innovative curriculum is aimed at maximizing physical activity among participants each session, while also providing nutrition education and information on healthy lifestyles through unique soccer activities. Since the program’s inception, the Soccer for Success program has become a national movement, serving over 71,000 children in more than 130 cities.

How can I obtain funding?

The request for proposals (RFP) and application can be found on the U.S. Soccer Foundation website. The RFP provides details regarding funding, timelines and qualifications. Grant applications are due no later than Thursday, October 27, 2016 at 11:59 pm EST. Grant awards will be announced by November 17, 2016. Please note that your program must be located in a specific community. Find out if your program location qualifies.

Grants from U.S. Soccer Foundation provide support for Soccer for Success programs in many ways. Awardees will be provided with jerseys, soccer balls, socks, shin guards and field equipment, based on the number of participants enrolled in Soccer for Success. In unique circumstances, cash grants can also be provided to organizations that need support to pay coaches, program management staff, and/or family and community engagement and miscellaneous program costs. Funding priority will be given to organizations that do not require this support.

Need more information?

The U.S. Soccer Foundation will hold a call for interested applicants on September 29, 2016. Information about this call can also be found on the U.S. Soccer Foundation website.

MAY
5
2016

IN THE FIELD
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Celebrate National Fitness and Sports Month!

By Tiereny Lloyd

You ready? 3,2,1…GO!

The month of May is National Physical Fitness and Sports Month! This annual observance highlights the importance of healthy lifestyles, being physically active and participating in your favorite sports. Critical to enabling children to reach their fullest potential, daily physical activity must go hand in hand with healthy eating and proper nutrition. During the month of May, we call upon all afterschool providers and advocates to raise awareness about the benefits of physical activity and healthy eating.

But wait! This month-long observance isn’t just about getting our kids active, it is also about being active adults! Yep, we are calling on you to be active too. Current Physical Activity Guidelines recommend that adults participate in at least 150 minutes of physical activity each week and youth participate in at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day! So as you plan those fun games and serve nutritious foods to the children in your programs, be sure to participate as well. Be an example! Be a physical activity and healthy eating role model.

To help you get started, here are just a few ideas to engage in this month (and beyond!):

  • Download and become familiar with National Afterschool Association’s Healthy Eating and Physical Activity standards
  • Introduce some fun activities into your programs
  • Sign up to be a PreventObesity.net Leader
  • Make sure children in your programs have access to nutritious snacks and meals through CACFP’s At-Risk Afterschool or USDA’s Summer Food Service programs
  • Share our Kids on the Move infographics and tweet supportive messages:
    • This #PhysFitMonth, afterschool is keeping millions of kids active & healthy! Learn how: http://ow.ly/4nsDuG
    • How is afterschool keeping kids active & healthy in your state this #PhysFitMonth? Find out from #AmericaAfter3PM! http://ow.ly/4nsDuG
  • Post pictures of the children in your program being physical activity to your program’s website
  • Add information about physical activity and healthy eating to your newsletters
  • Host a family fit & fun night! Have families come out and participate in their favorite sport
  • Identify youth leaders in your programs that can champion healthy lifestyles among their peers

To find other tips to get active during National Physical Fitness and Sports Month and beyond, visit www.fitness.gov

MAR
22
2016

IN THE FIELD
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California sets a healthy precedent with DASH program

By Tiereny Lloyd

California’s Senate Bill 949 has established the state’s Distinguished After-School Health (DASH) program, a recognition program that encourages healthy foods, beverages, physical activity and limited screen time in afterschool programs. Authored by State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson (D- Santa Barbara) and administered by the California Department of Education, DASH was signed into law in 2014.

Since then, the California Department of Education and the Superintendent of Public Instruction have been creating a DASH portal for both parents and programs. Parents searching for a healthy afterschool program will be able to find a list of DASH-certified programs on the state’s website, and DASH-certified programs will be able to display their certifications at program sites and on their website or materials.

Starting in March, providers of afterschool programs in the before-school, afterschool or summer learning program settings throughout the state can request certification. Applications will be accepted until April 8, 2016 and certificates will be valid for two years. To become certified, programs must show evidence of fulfilling the following requirements, which are largely consistent with the National Afterschool Association's Healthy Eating and Physical Activity standards:

MAR
16
2016

RESEARCH
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The first 1000 days: a critical time to prevent childhood obesity

By Tiereny Lloyd

Healthy Eating Research recently released a new issue brief on the impact of the first 1,000 days, or the period from conception through the age of 2, on childhood obesity. The issue brief is based on two review papers that examined evidence from selected studies published between January 1980 and December 2014. One paper reviewed the evidence on risk factors, while the other reviewed the evidence on the interventions in the first 1,000 days of life.

What does the evidence show?

  • Childhood obesity originates in early life.
  • The first years of life have a substantial impact on the disproportionate rates of obesity seen later in childhood, especially among racial and ethnic minorities.
    • Among 2-5 year olds, Hispanic children have rates of obesity five times higher than non-Hispanic white children.
    • Non-Hispanic black children have rates three times higher than white children.