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In the Field Snacks
SEP
18
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Afterschool Spotlight: Michigan Engineering Zone

By Marco Ornelas

As the home of the American auto industry and birthplace of Motown, Detroit has always been a hub for American ingenuity and creativity. But in 2013, Detroit became the largest American city to declare bankruptcy after decades of economic. The city officially exited bankruptcy in 2014 following a debt restructuring plan, but many feel that the work to get the city back on track has just begun.

Still, the transformation that’s begun in the heart of downtown Detroit, which city leaders and residents are working to channel into the outer neighborhoods, signals hope. The residents of Detroit have worked hard to fight widespread economic hardships and earned their home the nickname “Renaissance City.”

What is catalyzing the economic revival of this city? Efforts like the University of Michigan’s Michigan Engineering Zone (MEZ) are definitely a helping hand in restarting the economic engine.

SEP
15
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Guest blog: Standing up for immigrant kids

By Guest Blogger

By Sil Ganzó, executive director of ourBRIDGE for KIDS

Based in Charlotte, North Carolina, ourBRIDGE for KIDS is an afterschool program focused on helping newly-arrived and first-generation American children achieve academic success and integration into the community through innovative instructional methods and a celebration of cultural diversity. Our students represent more than 20 cultures from Southeast Asia, Africa, Middle East and Latin America.

In my role as executive director, I often have the opportunity to present our work to representatives of various corporations and foundations and meet potential advocates, volunteers, and donors who will further our mission of creating a community that embraces refugees and immigrants. The questions, feedback, and constant surge of ideas improves our program and makes my job truly exciting, and I love it. I like to think of myself as a fearless, outspoken advocate, but recently this notion was put up to the test.

SEP
12
2017

IN THE FIELD
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New grant: Pop Culture Collaborative's Pop-Up grants program

By Maria Leyva

Education around issues of equity, justice, diversity, and inclusion has become imperative in our current climate. And many afterschool programs working on the front lines are taking the lead by launching innovative efforts to break down barriers and create inclusive and just environments. If your organization has a creative, “outside of the box” project idea that integrates elements of pop culture, media, entertainment, etc. AND can be implemented in a short 4-month timeframe, this funding opportunity is worth considering.

The Pop Culture Collaborative is now accepting applications for our ‘Pop-Up’ grants program. These rapid response grants are available on a rolling basis throughout the year for any individual, organization or company working to harness the power of pop culture to create just, authentic narratives of people of color, Muslims, immigrants and refugees through TV, movies, sports, music and all forms of entertainment and mass media.

share this link: http://bit.ly/2y2Sbjb
learn more about: Funding Opportunity Arts
SEP
11
2017

IN THE FIELD
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How afterschool can help Hurricane Harvey relief

By Guest Blogger

By Heidi Ham, Vice Presidenct, Programs and Strategy at the National AfterSchool Association. This article was original published on September 5, 2017 on the National AfterSchool Association's website.

It's back to school (and afterschool) for most of the United States, but in Texas, Hurricane Harvey has shuttered hundreds of school districts.

According to the Texas Education Agency (TEA), Hurricane Harvey has had devastating effects on the education community of the Gulf Coast. More than one million students have been affected in some way. Formal and informal educators nearby and across the country are asking how they can help.

Michelle Pina from NAA's Texas Affiliate, the Texas AfterSchool Association (TAA), said, "The sun is shining but so many are still being rescued and evacuated after Harvey. Houston Independent School District (IDS) announced today that school would not resume until September 11 and surrounding districts are tentative for September. Many districts to the south have no start date because they are still without power. An organization in other states reached out to the TEA to see how afterschool programs can help Houston and other cities in Texas."

share this link: http://bit.ly/2wVJO8W
learn more about: Afterschool Voices Take Action
SEP
5
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Girls Who Code Clubs: Prepare girls in your community for the future

By Leah Silverberg

Girls Who Code, a national nonprofit working to close the gender gap in tech, wants to work with you! Through their afterschool Clubs Program, 6th-12th grade girls use computer science to impact their community and join a sisterhood of supportive peers and role models. Clubs can be hosted by many kinds of youth-serving organizations, including schools, community centers, faith-based organizations, universities, libraries, and other nonprofits.

All materials from Girls Who Code are provided for free, including:

  • 120+ hours of curriculum, activity sets, and an online learning management system
  • Recruitment materials, including student, and volunteer flyers
  • Program management support, including field trip and grant opportunities
  • Facilitator trainings, resources, and real-time support

 

share this link: http://bit.ly/2gIKo6a
learn more about: STEM Computer Science Girls
SEP
1
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Learn about child care in your state with Child Care Aware® of America!

By Leah Silverberg

Child Care Aware® of America is a national nonprofit and advocacy organization with the mission of increasing accessibility to high quality, affordable child care for all families in the United States. Research shows that quality early childhood education and care opportunities are linked to long term academic and social benefits.

As a means of providing advocacy tools for accessible and affordable options for youth in the United States, Child Care Aware® of America recently released their 2017, Checking In: A Snapshot of the Child Care Landscape – 2017 Report.

Checking In includes critical information from local and state child care resource and referral agencies, state and federal agencies, and national data sets that help show the landscape of child care in each state. Information on each state includes the use, supply, and cost of child care, as well as information on the child care workforce, and services provided by child care resource and referral agencies.

In recent years with the reauthorization of the Child Care and Development Block Grant in 2014, there have been major gains to increasing accessibility to quality child care for all. However, there is still much work to be done. The Child Care Aware® state fact sheets are prime advocacy tools for showing why increased accessibility to quality child care services is important in your state and in all states.

Download the fact sheet for your state and share with others using the 2017 Share Toolkit!

share this link: http://bit.ly/2gvJwl6
learn more about: Child Care
AUG
28
2017

IN THE FIELD
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New resource guide for bringing computer science to your program

By Leah Silverberg

In 2016, we set out to learn more about computer science in afterschool programs. What did we find? Afterschool programs really want to provide computer science to their students! A full 97 percent of programs that had offered computing in the past said they were “extremely likely” or “likely” to offer it again, and 89 percent of programs that had never offered computing education rated their interest in offering such programming as “high” or “medium.”

However, there are common obstacles that get in the way. First of all, computer science can be intimidating — especially for educators without a background in the computing field — and finding knowledgeable staff can be difficult. Beyond that, finding a quality and affordable curriculum can be a challenge, especially for programs that have never offered computer science before.

In the past few years there has been a lot of progress in creating computer science resources for afterschool and summer programs to make it easier for providers to offer computer science options to their students, but there is still a long way to go. So, we took the first steps and compiled a guide to get you started. Here is a sneak peak of some of the tips and resources:

AUG
24
2017

IN THE FIELD
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Police chiefs: Our communities need afterschool!

By Elizabeth Tish

One of the greatest benefits of quality afterschool programs is their ability to keep kids safe and engaged in learning after the end of the school day. That work isn’t going unnoticed: recently, we’ve seen a spate of police chiefs lending their voices to support afterschool and the positive impact it has on their communities.

Afterschool programs work,” Chief Russel B. Laine of the Fox Lake Police Department in Illinois wrote to the Northwest Herald.

Of a recent trip to the Illinois state capitol, Chief Laine recalled, “We asked that policymakers settle our state budget problems in a way that shores up some of Illinois’ most important weapons for fighting crime: proven investments in the well-being of children and youth.” Chief Laine emphasized that afterschool programs “help keep troubled youth off the streets during ‘prime time for juvenile crime,’ and help increase graduation rates.”

On the subject of funding cuts, Chief Laine had a clear message for the community: “Such shortsighted cuts, delays and stagnation hurt children and families throughout our state. But they also significantly set back efforts at reducing crime and violence.”