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MAY
6

IN THE FIELD
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Weekly Media Roundup  May 6, 2015

By Luci Manning

Texas Kids Need More After-School Options (TribTalk, Texas)

Andy Roddick, a former professional tennis player, and Molly Clayton, executive director of the Texas Partnership for Out of School Time, advocated for more state funding for afterschool programs in TribTalk: “Over 935,000 Texas schoolchildren are unsupervised in the critical hours after school… But despite continually unmet demand and positive academic outcomes, current public and private investments in after-school and summer programs are simply not enough. Federal funding for these programs, which is already unable to meet the growing demand, is at risk. Local governments and private philanthropy have been working to fill in gaps, but they can’t do it alone. The state of Texas has a much bigger role to play in ensuring that these programs are available, affordable and high quality.”

School Gardens Sprout in Central San Joaquin Valley (Fresno Bee, California)

Visalia Unified School District launched Growbiotics, an afterschool gardening program, last fall, and it’s already so popular that most of its 25 elementary schools have waiting lists. Each child gets one square foot of the garden, where it is their responsibility to plant seeds and seedlings, remove weeds, water the plants and harvest what they grow. They also regularly measure and record air and ground temperature. In the fall the students grow broccoli, cabbage, kohlrabi, carrots, spinach and beets, and spring gardens include squash, carrots, tomatoes, herbs, eggplants and lettuce. “I like how we can all come together and plant and harvest stuff,” fifth-grader Faith Bither told the Fresno Bee. “You can learn and do something fun.”

St. Paul Students Explore Jazz in Mobile After-School Program (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Minnesota)

The Mobile Jazz afterschool program is introducing students to jazz. At the twice-weekly program, 80 middle and high school students get a lesson from local professional musicians then break into smaller, concentrated groups – poets and songwriters, instrumentalists, singers and dancers, and those interested in audio production and the technical side of music. Students performed for their peers and the community at the culminating exhibition last week. Program creator Andrew Fischer said he hopes to give kids a place where their creativity can flow freely. “These little people need a safe environment to come out, to express themselves,” he told the St. Paul Pioneer Press

YWCA Children Go on Mother’s Day Shopping Spree (Deseret News, Utah)

Mother’s Day can be a hard time for women in domestic violence shelters, but a YWCA afterschool program and the nonprofit Women’s Edge are doing what they can to help. Nearly 40 students in the afterschool program participated in an all-expenses-paid Mother’s Day shopping spree Monday. Each child was paired with a Women’s Edge hostess, who helped the children find gifts for their moms and adhere to the $50 per mother budget. Kids selected bags, books, dresses and jewelry at marked-down prices, taking care to consider their moms’ favorite colors. “It’s cool to see how selfless kids can be,” Fred Meyers Jewelers sales associate Clark Henrikson told Deseret News. “They’re so excited to be able to be so generous.” 

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learn more about: Advocacy Nutrition Arts
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MAY
6

IN THE FIELD
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Afterschool biking programs build career skills and get kids active

By Rachel Clark

America After 3PM data shows us that afterschool programs are keeping kids active in plenty of unique ways. To highlight just one of the many activities programs are leveraging, we’re celebrating National Bike to School Day by featuring some of the programs that are empowering physical activity through biking.

  • In Kansas City, the FreeWheels for Kids program helps middle schoolers stay active and also empowers them to become leaders for healthy change in their community by teaching them how to fix bikes, build nature trails, and raise their voices in support of a bike-friendly community.
  • iCan Shine partners with public school districts around the country to host afterschool bike programs to enrich the lives of people with disabilities by offering the opportunity to learn to ride a bike—according to the organization, over 80% of people with Autism and 90% of people with Down syndrome never learn to ride a two-wheel bicycle.
  • Cycles of Change offers youth in Alameda County, California, opportunities to learn bicycle mechanics, earn bikes of their own, and go on “pedal-powered adventures” that get youth active while exploring their neighborhoods.
  • In Chicago, a DePaul University senior has pioneered Four Star Bikes, a workshop-based afterschool program that offers career skills while promoting activity in the community by teaching high schoolers to repair and build bicycles for community members.

Interested in finding a youth-focused bicycle program in your community this National Bike Month?  The International Bicycle Fund offers a directory of youth programs in the United States, Canada, and around the world. 

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learn more about: Health and Wellness
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MAY
5

IN THE FIELD
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Take a moment to celebrate afterschool educators this Teacher Appreciation Week

By Rachel Clark

Teacher Appreciation Week (May 4 through 8) is a great moment to thank our teachers, who devote their careers to educating youth. Teachers strive every day not only to provide an exemplary education to their students, but to offer a boost of confidence, or extra help, or a welcoming presence that kids can count on. Many even continue their day after the school bell rings by supporting students in afterschool programs – and many of our future teachers are afterschool educators who catch the teaching bug in programs.

This week, join NEA and the National PTA to say “Thank You” to an educator in your life, whether that’s an afterschool educator who inspires you, a loved one working in the education field, or a teacher who changed your life. Share your gratitude with the hashtag #ThankATeacher beginning on National Teacher Day (May 5) for a chance to receive a $100 VISA gift card to give to your favorite teacher for supplies!

Though we can’t ever thank educators enough, National Teacher Day and Teacher Appreciation Week serve as great reminders to reflect on the individuals who dedicate their lives to helping kids succeed, whether in school or out.

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MAY
4

FUNDING
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Citi Foundation, America's Promise Alliance launch $3 million fund

By Michael Burke

The Youth Opportunity Fund, led by the Citi Foundation and America’s Promise Alliance, has announced the availability of grants to nonprofits working in innovative ways to place low-income young adults on a path towards college and career success. The $3 million Fund will award one-year grants up to $250,000 to nonprofit organizations in 10 target U.S. cities: Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City, Newark, St. Louis, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

The Fund is part of the Citi Foundation’s Pathways to Progress initiative – a three-year, $50 million commitment to give 100,000 low-income youth in the United States the opportunity to develop the workplace skills and leadership experience necessary to compete in a 21st century economy. The Citi Foundation has selected America's Promise, the country’s leading alliance of organizations and communities committed to improving the lives of young people, to provide technical assistance and convene grantees to collaborate on the most effective ways to expand youth economic opportunity in their communities.

The Citi Foundation works to promote economic progress and improve the lives of people in low-income communities around the world. The Foundation invests in efforts that increase financial inclusion, catalyze job opportunities for youth, and reimagine approaches to building economically vibrant cities. The Citi Foundation's "More than Philanthropy" approach leverages the enormous expertise of Citi and its people to fulfill its mission and drive thought leadership and innovation.

 To learn more, please refer to the following guidelines or contact opportunity@americaspromise.org for information about eligibility or how to apply.

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APR
30

IN THE FIELD
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Guest blog: Baltimore is not burning

By Rachel Clark

Ellie Mitchell is the Director of the Maryland Out of School Time Network.

The last few days in Baltimore have been disappointing though not shocking to any of us who live and work here. The media coverage as you might expect has sensationalized what have been high impact, but relatively isolated incidents of looting and property destruction.  There will be a high economic impact, an even greater emotional impact.  Hard to believe the Orioles played a game to an empty stadium yesterday.

Of greatest concern to us at the Maryland Out of School Time Network has been the involvement of young people and how the media has portrayed young people in Baltimore City.  We are working with a number of organizations to highlight the positive contributions of young people—many have been involved in the clean up—and to underscore how the lack of opportunity in the city has contributed to the sense of despair that is the precursor to this kind of violence.

On Monday morning, I was at the high school, Frederick Douglass, which is directly across from the mall where the altercation between police and students began.  I was working with a group of students who produce a TV show called Baltimore Pioneers.  I can tell you the full story about how students ended up engaging with police there has not been told.  On Monday afternoon as the worst of the incidents began, I was with a group of advocates at a press conference prior to a City Council hearing where the City Council voted unanimously to increase funding for out-of-school time and community school programming in the city, a positive step for the community.  The resolution is non-binding but is intended to send a message to the Mayor prior to her sending her budget to the City Council for approval.

Today we are focused on getting out in the community and providing support where we can and also thinking longer term about providing trauma informed care training, and participating in the forums to support youth voice and leadership.  Baltimore is just the most recent stop of this train.

To learn more about the important work being done by youth programs in Baltimore, visit MOST’s Facebook page, where they have highlighted some of the positive contributions young people are making in the community.

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learn more about: Guest Blog State Networks Youth Development
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APR
30

POLICY
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FY2016 appropriations process continues in House and Senate

By Erik Peterson

With House and Senate Budget Committee Chairmen announcing this week that the Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Conference has reached an agreement on a joint Congressional balanced budget resolution, the FY2016 appropriations process is starting to move forward in earnest.  A challenge for appropriators will be meeting the needs of children and families given the constraints of lower spending levels.

House and Senate appropriations committees have begun holding hearings on the FY2016 spending bills, including Labor, HHS, Education (LHHS) Appropriations Subcommittee hearings featuring testimony by Education Secretary Arne Duncan and a public witness hearing this week.  At the House subcommittee hearing in early March, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) emphasized the importance of maintaining strong investments in afterschool programs through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) initiative.

This week, Karen West, Special Projects Curriculum Supervisor, Corbin Independent Schools of Corbin, Kentucky, represented the Afterschool Alliance at a public witness hearing of the Subcommittee, presenting heartfelt testimony and calling for continued federal support of 21st CCLC, stating:

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learn more about: 21st CCLC Congress Federal Policy Legislation
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APR
29

STEM
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Imagine Science campaign celebrates nationwide launch in Orange County

By Sophie Papavizas

Four of the nation’s largest youth organizations, Boys and Girls Clubs of America, National 4-H Council, YMCA of the USA and Girls Inc. recently launched their joint Imagine Science campaign.  Collectively, these organizations reach 18 million youth in every state and territory and have the potential to reach millions of underrepresented youth through enriching STEM experiences.  Imagine Science was also listed as a commitment by the four organizations to the White House’s Educate to Innovate campaign, a nationwide public-private partnership to prepare students at every level for careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Leveraging the expertise of the organizations involved, Imagine Science will be a multifaceted project bringing mobile STEM labs to large audiences, hosting 1-2 day STEM Challenges and Expos, running summer camps, and engaging youth with one of the partner organizations during the school year.  This year, a pilot summer program will be rolled out in three cities, Dallas, TX, Omaha, NE, and Orange County, CA.  This past weekend, the campaign’s first event took place, consisting of a booth at the Imaginology Youth Expo at the Orange County Fair organized by the pilot program in Orange County.  Youth had the opportunity to take part in a booth called “Happy City Construction” constructing paper buildings that could be hooked up to the ‘grid’ of the imaginary city.

You can view pictures from the event on the Imagine Science OC Twitter and Instagram pages and join the Imagine Science mailing list here.

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learn more about: Science Community Partners
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APR
29

NEWS ROUNDUP
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Weekly Media Roundup  April 29, 2015

By Luci Manning

Save the Children Leads Charge to Protect Kids (Newport Plain Talk, Tennessee)

Each day, 68 million children are away from their parents in school or child care, and yet less than half of American families have an emergency plan or a way to reunite if a disaster were to occur. To fill this gap, Save the Children made disaster preparedness a priority at their Edgemont afterschool program through the Get Ready Get Safe Prep Rally last week. Throughout the week, students learned how they can help their families prepare for emergencies through practical lessons and discussions paired with fun and engaging activities, like the Disaster Supplies Relay Race and Emergency Mad Libs. A Family Night was held at the end of the week, where children shared what they had learned with their parents. “The Prep Rally program makes disasters less scary by giving children the tools they need to prepare and be ready,” afterschool teacher Crystal Chambers told Newport Plain Talk.

A New Twist on the Old Lemonade Stand (Albuquerque Journal, New Mexico)

An afterschool program is using the age-old lemonade stand concept to teach kids how to start and run a business, according to the Albuquerque Journal. About 250 kids from Albuquerque elementary schools will set up dozens of lemonade stands throughout the city on Lemonade Day, May 2. The Rio Grande Collaborative, which runs the Albuquerque branch of the national program, provides students the entrepreneurial curriculum, and then it’s up to the kids to find an investor – usually their parents – and use the money to buy ingredients, make the lemonade and run their sales stand. Kids have to keep track of all their expenses and pay back their investors, just like in the real business world.

Dormont After-School Program Blends Art, Movement (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pennsylvania)

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre and the nonprofit Art Expression Inc. have teamed up to create an afterschool program focused on the intersection of visual arts, rhythm and movement. Each session of the free six-week program, called “ARTS in Motion,” combines music, dance and visual arts in activities that share a common theme. In a recent session, students made a collage about their feelings then acted out those feelings to a drum beat. The program aims to increase students’ self-esteem, enhance their social skills and improve their self-expression abilities. “We think the combination of what Art Expression can bring in terms of emotional well-being and what we (Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre) can bring in terms of physical well-being is really exciting,” PBT manager of community programs Lisa Auel told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

City May Restore Rec Center Hours (San Diego Union-Tribune, California)

San Diego’s neighborhood recreation centers saw their hours cut significantly between 2003 and 2012, but under Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s new budget proposal, many of those hours may be restored. The budget would increase the weekly hours of the city’s 16 busiest recreation centers from 45 to 60. The rec centers are a hub of activity – hosting youth sports leagues, enrichment classes for preschoolers and senior fitness classes – but many supporters believe the centers’ afterschool programs are what really make a difference. “Recreation centers are particularly important in communities where there aren’t Boys & Girls Clubs and families can’t afford things like YMCAs,” Councilman David Alvarez told the San Diego Union-Tribune. “Our rec centers are really the only place for young people to be active during after-school hours and have a safe place to play.” 

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