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Afterschool Snack, the afterschool blog. The latest research, resources, funding and policy on expanding quality afterschool and summer learning programs for children and youth. An Afterschool Alliance resource.
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SEP
19
2016

FUNDING
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Funding opportunity: Bring Soccer for Success to your afterschool program

By Tiereny Lloyd

photo courtesy of the U.S. Soccer Foundation

In partnership with Trinity Health, the U.S. Soccer Foundation recently announced a funding opportunity to expand their free out of school program, Soccer for Success. The Foundation seeks community partners to implement this program for 12 weeks during the spring of 2017, and who will return to operate the program for 24 weeks during the 2017-2018 academic year (fall 2017 through spring 2018).

What is Soccer for Success?

Soccer for Success is an evidence-based program created by the U.S. Soccer Foundation that uses soccer as a tool to address children’s health issues and juvenile delinquency, while promoting healthy lifestyles in urban and underserved communities. The program’s innovative curriculum is aimed at maximizing physical activity among participants each session, while also providing nutrition education and information on healthy lifestyles through unique soccer activities. Since the program’s inception, the Soccer for Success program has become a national movement, serving over 71,000 children in more than 130 cities.

How can I obtain funding?

The request for proposals (RFP) and application can be found on the U.S. Soccer Foundation website. The RFP provides details regarding funding, timelines and qualifications. Grant applications are due no later than Thursday, October 27, 2016 at 11:59 pm EST. Grant awards will be announced by November 17, 2016. Please note that your program must be located in a specific community. Find out if your program location qualifies.

Grants from U.S. Soccer Foundation provide support for Soccer for Success programs in many ways. Awardees will be provided with jerseys, soccer balls, socks, shin guards and field equipment, based on the number of participants enrolled in Soccer for Success. In unique circumstances, cash grants can also be provided to organizations that need support to pay coaches, program management staff, and/or family and community engagement and miscellaneous program costs. Funding priority will be given to organizations that do not require this support.

Need more information?

The U.S. Soccer Foundation will hold a call for interested applicants on September 29, 2016. Information about this call can also be found on the U.S. Soccer Foundation website.

SEP
15
2016

RESEARCH
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New report: Participation in summer learning programs yields positive outcomes

By Erin Murphy

A new report shows that high levels of participation in summer learning programs can provide positive benefits for low-income students’ math and language arts performance and social-emotional skills. Last week, The Wallace Foundation released Learning from Summer: Effects of Voluntary Summer Learning Programs on Low-Income Urban Youththe third and final report analyzing the outcomes of their National Summer Learning Project.

This report, conducted by the RAND Corporation, is part of a six-year study offering the first-ever assessment of the effectiveness of voluntary, no-cost summer learning programs on the academic achievement, social-emotional competencies, and behavior of low-income, urban, elementary students. In fall 2013, third grade students enrolled in one of five urban school districts—Boston, Dallas, Jacksonville (FL), Pittsburgh, or Rochester (NY)—were selected to participate in the study. Half of the students were invited to participate in summer programming while half were not, and data on academic performance, social emotional skills, behavior and attendance was collected on both groups through the end of seventh grade.

Key findings on summer learning programs:

  • Students who were “high-attenders”—those attending a summer program at least 20 days—saw near and long-term positive effects in math assessments throughout the study.
  • High-attenders saw near and long-term positive effects in language arts assessments after the second summer of programming.
  • High-attenders saw positive benefits for their social and emotional skills after the second summer of programming.
  • When programs focused on math or language arts, students saw lasting positive gains in these subjects. Students who received a minimum of 25 hours of math instruction or 34 hours in language arts instruction during the summer outperformed students who did not receive the same level of instruction in the relevant subject in fall assessments. The report also found that the positive effects lasted into the spring after the second summer.
  • Providing students an invitation to attend did not lead to substantial long-term benefits, because of high rates of non-participation and low-attendance rates.
Infographic courtesy of the Wallace Foundation.
SEP
14
2016

NEWS ROUNDUP
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Weekly Media Roundup: September 14, 2016

By Luci Manning

In a Class of Their Own (Bergen County Record, New Jersey)

A robotics club at John F. Kennedy High School has helped three students from difficult backgrounds become the first members of their families to attend a four-year college. Syrian refugee Rasha Alrifae, Bangladeshi immigrant Muhammad Naeem and lifelong Paterson resident Zyheir Williams all found a “second home” in the afterschool club, according to the Bergen County Record. The program helped Alrifae learn English and pushed her to major in biology. Naeem learned to code in three programming languages and pursued computer science classes at a local community college. Williams was inspired to put in hundreds of volunteer hours and eventually won a $5,000 scholarship to attend Rutgers University.

Con Students Fill Music-Education Gap (Oberlin Review, Ohio)

As state budget cuts threaten school arts programs across Ohio, several Oberlin Conservatory students are trying to fill the gap with an afterschool music education program at Langston Middle School. The program provides relief to the school’s dwindling number of music teachers and gives low-income students a chance to learn how to play instruments they may not have access to outside of school. “The goal of the Music Mentors Program is to help public schools in Oberlin negate some of these effects by helping with music classes … and running after school programs for students to expand their musical education,” Oberlin junior and program head Ben Steger told the Oberlin Review.

Planet Fitness Debuts Fitness Room for Kids at Boys and Girls Club in Manchester (Union Leader, New Hampshire)

Nearly 1,700 Boys & Girls Club of Manchester participants will now have a chance to use a special workout room at the Club that’s part of a larger effort to promote healthy lifestyles and stop bullying. Planet Fitness’ new “Mini Judgement Free Zone” is part of the company’s $1.3 million commitment to support an anti-bullying initiative with the Boys & Girls Clubs of America and STOMP Out Bullying. The room includes treadmills, a stationary bike, strength training equipment, and is full of motivational posters and messages. “It really is about a bigger movement than just the gym,” Planet Fitness senior vice president of marketing Jessica Correa told the Union Leader. “It’s about creating an afterschool curriculum that will give kids the tools to prevent bullying and spread kindness instead.”

Making the Case for Mariachi (San Francisco Chronicle, California)

The Mariachi Academy of Music in San Jose is part of a growing trend to bring mariachi music to young students throughout the Bay Area who lack opportunities for music education. The Academy works with school districts and private donors to bring free or low-cost mariachi classes to students in several towns in the area, exposing youths to a culturally rich and easy-to-learn style of music. “Mariachi is such a wonderful introduction,” Tamara Alvarado, executive director of the School of Arts & Culture at the Mexican Heritage Plaza in San Jose, told the San Francisco Chronicle. “With mariachi, you can see yourself progress, and be part of a group. That’s what’s cool about mariachi: Everyone is the star.” 

SEP
14
2016

POLICY
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House passes an updated career and technical education bill

By Jillian Luchner

photo by Rabi Samuel

The bipartisan Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, the proposed House update to the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education (CTE) Act of 2006, was placed on the House of Representatives suspension calendar yesterday and passed overwhelmingly with 405 affirmative votes of support. This is good news for the education and afterschool community, as the proposed law would extend opportunities for schools and communities to collaborate in engaging students in career pathways to well-paid, in demand careers.

The Afterschool Alliance submitted a letter of support for the bill to the House Education and Workforce (HEW) committee this week. The bill, as outlined in an earlier blog, includes many positive advances: explicitly including community based organizations as eligible, extending eligible programming to begin in the 5th grade, drawing attention to the need for workplace/employability skills, and focusing on underrepresented groups within career categories, among other well-needed updates.

The Senate has now scheduled its mark-up of the Perkins legislation for next Wednesday, September 21. Whispers around Capitol Hill suggest that the Senate does not have any major disagreements on updating the legislation, but we must wait and see what the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee releases.

The Afterschool Alliance is glad that the model of effective, bipartisan work done in the House and continued awareness of the value of updated legislation has motivated the Senate into action. Feel free as always to make your own voices heard! We will aim to keep you updated as the legislative session continues.

For more general information on CTE and Career Pathways, visit our Career Pathways webpage.

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learn more about: Congress Federal Policy Legislation
SEP
12
2016

POLICY
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Afterschool & Law Enforcement: New tools for working with school resource officers

By Erik Peterson

The Afterschool Alliance is pleased to present this post as part of the Afterschool & Law Enforcement blog series. For more information on the ways afterschool programs are partnering with local police, check out our previous blogs on building relationships and trust, the motivations for partnerships and on the law enforcement caucus’ briefing on youth mentoring.

Late last week, the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Justice released several new tools in the form of letters to states and districts emphasizing the importance of well-designed school resource officer (SRO) programs. School resource officers are law enforcement officers who provide security and crime prevention services to school communities. These new tools are intended to help SRO programs improve school climate, ensure safety for students and support student achievement in schools nationwide.

To the extent a local decision is made to use SROs in community schools, these resources will help state and local education and law enforcement agencies responsibly incorporate SROs in the learning environment. Additionally, the Departments have highlighted tools available for law enforcement agencies that also apply to higher education campus law enforcement agencies.

To assist states, schools and their law enforcement partners in assessing the proper role of SROs and campus law enforcement professionals, both the Education Department's and the Justice Department's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services released letters to states and districts emphasizing the importance of well-designed SRO programs and calling on leaders of institutions of higher education to commit to implementing recommendations from the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing in the campus policing context.

To assist in the K-12 context, the Departments also jointly released the Safe, School-based Enforcement through Collaboration, Understanding, and Respect (SECURe) Rubrics. These new resources can help education and law enforcement agencies that use SROs to review and, if necessary, revise SRO-related policies in alignment with common-sense action steps that can lead to improved school safety and better outcomes for students while safeguarding their civil rights.

Afterschool advocates at the state and local level have been working with community organizations, school district leadership and law enforcement on using the afterschool setting as a venue to build better relationships between law enforcement and young people. The new tools released by the Departments of Education and Justice are a welcome addition to the resources available for this work. 

SEP
12
2016

IN THE FIELD
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Summer learning attracts attention of National Academies

By Jen Rinehart

Infographic courtesty of the National Summer Learning Association.

In late August, the Board on Children, Youth & Families at the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine hosted a day-long workshop focused on summertime opportunities to promote healthy child and adolescent development. Back in 1999, a similar workshop, which focused on Opportunities to Promote Child and Adolescent Development During the After-School Hours, led to the publication of Community Programs to Promote Youth Development, an important resource for funders, policy makers and afterschool practitioners. 

It was great to see the National Academies return attention to the important role of out-of-school time learning. The summertime opportunities workshop highlighted the latest research on summer and explored linkages between summer programs and the broader ecosystem of learning, including schools, museums, libraries and afterschool programs. It was a day of great discussions that reflected the diverse community and accomplishments of summer learning and afterschool programs. 

The workshop featured sessions on the achievement gap, the value of play, reducing obesity, city-systems, program quality and evaluation and role of afterschool and summer in the overall learning ecosystem. A sampling of a few of the organizations on the panels include the Association of Children’s Museums, the Food Research and Action Center, the National League of Cities and the American Institutes for Research. The Afterschool Alliance was glad to included on a panel focusing on ecosystems that support children's development, alongside representatives from the national YMCA and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Better understanding of summer learning on the horizon

The day-long workshop set the stage for a potential effort to produce a “consensus study,” which would provide new information and recommendations to inform federal, state, and local policy decisions about how best to use the summer months to support the healthy development of America's children. With new research out from the RAND Corporation and The Wallace Foundation showing gains in math and reading among elementary school students with high levels of attendance in voluntary summer learning programs, the timing of a more thorough investigation into summer learning by the National Academies could not be better!

The PowerPoint presentations from the workshop are available on the National Academies website and videos of the workshop sessions will be posted to in the next couple of weeks. An 8-page written summary of the workshop proceedings is anticipated to be released in early November, which we will be sure to share with readers.

SEP
7
2016

NEWS ROUNDUP
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Weekly Media Roundup: September 7, 2016

By Luci Manning

A $1 Million Gift for Homework Aid (Los Angeles Times, California)

The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation donated $1 million to the Los Angeles Public Library to expand the free afterschool homework centers that serve LA Unified schools’ 16,000 homeless students. The centers give students access to computers and printers and offer academic assistance. “We know that the hours immediately after school are crucial to the success of many young people,” Library Foundation of Los Angeles president Ken Brecher told the Los Angeles Times. “The generosity of the Broad Foundation helps to make our student zones true safe havens and productive centers for students to do their homework now and in the future.”

Lafayette Fourth-Graders Learning About Government, Engagement (Daily Camera, Colorado)

About 60 fourth graders at Alia Sanchez International Elementary are learning about the importance of civic engagement through the Lafayette Peer Empowerment Project. Students in the afterschool program learn about how local government operates, then identify problems within their city, state or country and write persuasive essays to officials to encourage them to address these issues. “It’s a really good topic to learn about,” fourth-grader Josue Cordova told the Daily Camera. “It helps our community to encourage kids to help out.” The group recently had a visit from Lafayette Mayor Christine Berg, who explained how the city council and the mayor work with various departments and community organizations to run the city.

Childhood Literacy: Fort Worth Leaders Take Aim at Reading (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Texas)

Fort Worth city officials, schools, community organizations and businesses are collaborating on a new initiative to improve child literacy, aiming to get all Fort Worth third-graders reading at grade level by 2025. Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price said the project will reach students through afterschool and summer programs at schools, libraries and community centers, and will also target young children to make sure they enter kindergarten with the skills they need to succeed. “Every program we touch will have a literacy component,” Price told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “Schools can’t do this alone. It’s daunting, but this is a city that very much has a can-do spirit. We’ve got to. There’s too much at stake.”

OUT OF THIS WORLD: Russell Elementary’s Space Program to Continue Exploring the Final Frontier (Marietta Daily Journal, Georgia)

Every May, a crew of Russell Elementary School students in the Russell Space Center’s afterschool program set off on a 27-hour simulated space mission, but this year’s program was in jeopardy until Atlanta area businesses donated time and supplies to fix the program’s space simulator. Over the course of the school year, student astronauts take off in the “Intrepid” space simulator while their peers run mission control, using complex math and science skills to handle the launch. Program head Chris Laster told the Marietta Daily Journal that the students work with minimal teacher input and use teamwork and problem-solving skills to make sure the astronauts get home safely. After this summer’s improvements and upgrades, the simulator’s roof should last another 25 years.

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learn more about: Science Working Families Literacy
SEP
7
2016

LIGHTS ON
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Guest blog: Discover drones at your Lights On Afterschool event

By Robert Abare

Written by Griffin Schwed, Integrated Marketing Manager at National 4-H Council

See how your program can celebrate 4-H National Youth Science Day at your 2016 Lights On Afterschool event on our Celebrate Afterschool STEM page, part of the revamped Lights On Afterschool website.

Since 2008, 4-H National Youth Science Day has engaged millions of youth around the world in exciting and innovative STEM learning and experiences, from wind power to robotics to rocketry. This year, the 4-H NYSD challenge is soaring to new heights with the 2016 National Science Challenge, Drone Discovery, developed by Cornell University Cooperative Extension.

This year's hands-on science challenge explores the science behind drones and how they are being used to solve real world problems. Youth will learn everything from flight dynamics and aircraft types, to remote sensing and flight control, as well as safety and regulations.

While the official 4-H NYSD event takes place on October 5, 2016 in Washington, D.C., clubs, groups and schools around the world are also inspiring the next generation of STEM leaders, all taking part in what is known as the world’s largest, youth-led science event.

Participating in 4-H National Youth Science Day is easy:

  • Purchase a 4-H NYSD Challenge Kit. Each kit includes all the necessary items needed to participate in the challenge, including youth and facilitator guide books and experiment materials. Kits are available for purchase now on the 4-H Mall.
  • Register your event. Simply create a 4-H NYSD membership account to receive helpful resources and materials and see your local event showcased on our national 4-H NYSD map.
  • Join the conversation on social media. Share your event photos and videos using hashtag #4HNYSD. Your event could be featured nationally!

So what are you waiting for? Put what you know about engineering, drones and flight into action. Purchase your kit, register your event, and get ready to take flight in this worldwide science phenomenon!