RSS | Go To: afterschoolalliance.org
Get Afterschool Updates
Afterschool Snack, the afterschool blog. The latest research, resources, funding and policy on expanding quality afterschool and summer learning programs for children and youth. An Afterschool Alliance resource.
Afterschool Donation
Afterschool on Facebook
Afterschool on Twitter
Afterschool Snack Bloggers
Select blogger:
Recent Afterschool Snacks
SEP
11
2017

IN THE FIELD
email
print

How afterschool can help Hurricane Harvey relief

By Guest Blogger

By Heidi Ham, Vice Presidenct, Programs and Strategy at the National AfterSchool Association. This article was original published on September 5, 2017 on the National AfterSchool Association's website.

It's back to school (and afterschool) for most of the United States, but in Texas, Hurricane Harvey has shuttered hundreds of school districts.

According to the Texas Education Agency (TEA), Hurricane Harvey has had devastating effects on the education community of the Gulf Coast. More than one million students have been affected in some way. Formal and informal educators nearby and across the country are asking how they can help.

Michelle Pina from NAA's Texas Affiliate, the Texas AfterSchool Association (TAA), said, "The sun is shining but so many are still being rescued and evacuated after Harvey. Houston Independent School District (IDS) announced today that school would not resume until September 11 and surrounding districts are tentative for September. Many districts to the south have no start date because they are still without power. An organization in other states reached out to the TEA to see how afterschool programs can help Houston and other cities in Texas."

share this link: http://bit.ly/2wVJO8W
learn more about: Afterschool Voices Take Action
SEP
8
2017

RESEARCH
email
print

Evaluating afterschool: What my toddler taught me about evaluation

By Guest Blogger

By Allison Riley, PhD, MSW, Senior Vice President, Programming and Evaluation at Girls on the Run International. Girls on the Run is a physical activity-based positive youth development program that inspires girls to be joyful, healthy, and confident using a fun, experience-based curriculum that creatively integrates running.

The Afterschool Alliance is pleased to present the seventh installment of our "Evaluating afterschool" blog series, which answers some of the common questions asked about program evaluation and highlights program evaluation best practices. Be sure to take a look at the firstsecondthirdfourthfifth, and sixth posts of the series.

My two-year-old daughter and I like to take walks together when I get home from work. Whether we are headed to see the neighbor’s chickens or visit a friend, we always have some goal in mind when we walk out of the door, though my toddler typically doesn’t take the most direct path. Even if I try to rush her along so we can more quickly reach our destination, she is sure to pause when a good learning opportunity comes her way. When I follow my daughter’s lead, our walks are purposeful yet flexible, and I always learn more, too.

As it turns out, my daughter’s approach to a walk translates well to my workday world. As someone who’s spent my career evaluating youth programming, I have learned the importance of having a clear purpose and goals for a project while being flexible and responsive to information gathered during the evaluation process. Let’s look at a recent Girls on the Run study as an example.

SEP
8
2017

POLICY
email
print

Policy update: What this week means for afterschool funding

By Erik Peterson

After being out of Washington for the month of August, the House and Senate returned this week with a full agenda including advancing the fiscal year 2018 (FY18) spending process. Both the Senate Appropriations Committee and the House of Representatives took actions this week that could impact federal support for afterschool and summer learning programs. Moreover, a Continuing Resolution passed extending current federal funding to December 8.

Senate appropriations

The Senate Labor, Health and Human Services, Education (LHHS) Appropriations Subcommittee passed their FY18 spending bill on September 6, followed by the full Senate Appropriations Committee on September 7. The Senate’s LHHS spending bill funded 21st Century Community Learning Centers at the FY 17 level of $1.192 billion, rejecting the president’s proposed elimination of the program. For the second year in a row, the Senate appropriations subcommittee produced a bipartisan bill that provides leverage in negotiations with the House of Representatives. Read the Afterschool Alliance’s statement on the Senate Appropriations Committee’s strong support for afterschool and summer learning programs.

SEP
7
2017

LIGHTS ON
email
print

Take a tour of our Lights On Afterschool resources

By Faith Savaiano

Lights On Afterschool is just seven weeks away, and everyone seems busy and bristling with questions! Are you looking for event ideas? Not sure how to invite your elected officials to your celebration? Need a few tips on what to do after October 26?

Well, we’re here to help! Whether this is your first Lights On Afterschool or you’ve been coordinating celebrations since 2000, we’ve got resources to make this year’s celebration your biggest and best yet.

Need to make the case for a Lights On Afterschool event?

Especially for new programs or programs that haven’t participated in Lights On Afterschool before, it can be difficult to explain to parents, media, and community members just what Lights On Afterschool is. If you need top-level points about why Lights on Afterschool is important and the value that hosting an event brings to your community and program, head over to the “Event Planning” overview.

This year, Lights On Afterschool will be an important tool for afterschool advocates when fighting to maintain funding. To learn about the policy and funding challenge afterschool is facing this year and the crucial role your event will play, check out our webinar, “Fight Budget Cuts using Lights On Afterschool.

share this link: http://bit.ly/2wM8Lnv
learn more about: Lights On Afterschool
SEP
6
2017

NEWS ROUNDUP
email
print

Weekly Media Roundup: September 6, 2017

By Luci Manning

Bluffs Summer School Collaboration Proves a ‘Match Made in Heaven’ (Daily Nonpareil, Iowa)

Thanks to a record number of community partners, funding from multiple grants and new creative programming, the Council Bluffs Community School District reached more than 1,000 students through its summer school program this year. According to the Daily Nonpareil, the district joined with the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program and the Iowa Reading Research Center to assemble a well-rounded program for students of all ages. Through the program, youths had a chance to interact with local businesses, program robots, and visit the zoo to learn about biology.

Mayor Curry Tours After-School Program at Pinedale Elementary (WJXT, Florida)

After committing a total of $13 million of extra funding to afterschool programs several weeks ago, Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry took a trip to Pinedale Elementary School last week to see one of the programs in action. Mayor Curry had a chance to speak to several educators who conveyed how important afterschool is for their students. “The students actually receive an extension of the school day in those skills that they are primarily showing some areas of weakness, or concern, so the academic hour is based on their needs,” Pinedale Elementary School Principal Alicia Hinson told WJXT. The extra funding will give more than 8,000 Jacksonville students access to afterschool programs.

Making Afterschool Programs Work (Jackson Free Press, Mississippi)

Afterschool Ambassador Amber May was interviewed by the Jackson Free Press about her afterschool and summer program at Operation Shoestring and how it benefits Jackson’s youths. “It's about making sure the children are safe, first off,” she said. “It's about helping working families (so) they're able to work with the peace of mind of knowing that child is not only safe but that the child is getting the assistance they need on their homework assignments, they're getting any other type of academic help they need, a nutritious snack. And then also it's about inspiring children to learn.” The nonprofit works with pre-kindergarten and elementary school students on a variety of academic subjects, with a special emphasis on literacy.

An After School Program That Offers Structure, Down Time and Karate (Bangor Daily News, Maine)

Stacy Kim’s Kuma Fitness and Leadership program gives students a place to unwind after school, work on homework and get active. Each day at the program, youths enjoy a healthy snack, do some work, draw or participate in other quiet activities, then spend half an hour practicing karate or partaking in another fitness class. The karate classes teach students confidence, discipline and respect, according to Kim. “I truly feel like [Stacy’s] focus is on building better little people who will grow into better adults versus just teaching karate,” parent Anne Thurlow told the Bangor Daily News

share this link: http://bit.ly/2gHKNSx
learn more about: In The News Physical Activity
SEP
5
2017

IN THE FIELD
email
print

Girls Who Code Clubs: Prepare girls in your community for the future

By Leah Silverberg

Girls Who Code, a national nonprofit working to close the gender gap in tech, wants to work with you! Through their afterschool Clubs Program, 6th-12th grade girls use computer science to impact their community and join a sisterhood of supportive peers and role models. Clubs can be hosted by many kinds of youth-serving organizations, including schools, community centers, faith-based organizations, universities, libraries, and other nonprofits.

All materials from Girls Who Code are provided for free, including:

  • 120+ hours of curriculum, activity sets, and an online learning management system
  • Recruitment materials, including student, and volunteer flyers
  • Program management support, including field trip and grant opportunities
  • Facilitator trainings, resources, and real-time support

 

share this link: http://bit.ly/2gIKo6a
learn more about: STEM Computer Science Girls
SEP
1
2017

IN THE FIELD
email
print

Learn about child care in your state with Child Care Aware® of America!

By Leah Silverberg

Child Care Aware® of America is a national nonprofit and advocacy organization with the mission of increasing accessibility to high quality, affordable child care for all families in the United States. Research shows that quality early childhood education and care opportunities are linked to long term academic and social benefits.

As a means of providing advocacy tools for accessible and affordable options for youth in the United States, Child Care Aware® of America recently released their 2017, Checking In: A Snapshot of the Child Care Landscape – 2017 Report.

Checking In includes critical information from local and state child care resource and referral agencies, state and federal agencies, and national data sets that help show the landscape of child care in each state. Information on each state includes the use, supply, and cost of child care, as well as information on the child care workforce, and services provided by child care resource and referral agencies.

In recent years with the reauthorization of the Child Care and Development Block Grant in 2014, there have been major gains to increasing accessibility to quality child care for all. However, there is still much work to be done. The Child Care Aware® state fact sheets are prime advocacy tools for showing why increased accessibility to quality child care services is important in your state and in all states.

Download the fact sheet for your state and share with others using the 2017 Share Toolkit!

share this link: http://bit.ly/2gvJwl6
learn more about: Child Care
AUG
31
2017

LIGHTS ON
email
print

How to bring advocacy to your Lights On Afterschool event

By Erik Peterson

With many of the nation’s students back in school and afterschool, it is time to start thinking about planning a Light On Afterschool event for the month of October. Lights On Afterschool is an excellent opportunity to show policymakers and elected officials, as well as parents and community members, what takes place in your program when the lights are on – and conversely what learning opportunities students miss out on in communities where the lights are off afterschool.

Here are a few ways to get the word out in support of afterschool programs at your Lights On Afterschool event: